It’s going to be a flip flop summer! I forget where I found this fun article but I thought I’d share. I have a small flip flop buying problem, (more on that in a future post) so my interest is always peeked when this most causal of footware is on display.  Have a great weekend!

There’s news on the flip-flop front.

If you want to make it easier on your legs and feet, look for more structured flip-flops that hold your foot in place, possibly ones with heel cups and arches, says Justin Shroyer, an assistant professor of kinesiology at the University of Louisiana-Lafayette.

“The less flip in your flop, the better it is for your feet and legs,” Shroyer says.

He has studied more than 100 people wearing flip-flops, looking at how the shoes affect legs and feet. He presented some of his research last week at the American College of Sports Medicine’s annual meeting in Baltimore. Among his findings:

-When people wear flip-flops, the muscles on the front of their shins (tibialis anterior) work harder than they do when people are barefoot. The increased muscle activity may be a result of the toes trying to grip the shoe to keep it in place, Shroyer says.

-Flip-flops shorten your stride length and can cause pain in your lower legs.

Flip-flops with heel cups and arch support help you walk more naturally, Shroyer says. “The more the shoe conforms to your foot, the better off your foot and leg will be. If it’s loose, your foot has to work harder to keep your flip-flop on.”

He doesn’t advise wearing flip-flops for long walks because they cause your shin muscles to work much harder. You’re better off wearing an athletic shoe with good support, he says.

“But if you are just walking from the car to the beach or pool, flip-flops are fine.”

Cheers,
RumShopRyan